Sidney J. Gluck on Harold Channer’s Show



Sidney J. Gluck Original air date 03-12-13

This is an interview I did with Harold Channer on his program “Conversations.” He has hosted 2,700 guests on this program, and here he takes me through my childhood and younger years, and discusses my favorite issues, including economic development, social security, and China. As usual, your comments are appreciated.

Social Security is Capital that Belongs to the Public

 

96 yearr old Social Security recipient Sidney J. Glück, retired 50-year economics professor and business owner, demands President Obama and Congress respect the public nature of Social Security funds and refuse to cut them for the very workers who paid into them. Here, China and Venezuela are among many countries that have copied the social security system for the disabled, the unemployed, and the retired, but have chosen not to squander public capital in the interest of protecting private finance capital.

 

As always, your comments are welcome.

US China Relations

Dear Colleagues,
In the light of Obama’s successful re-election, I would like to share an article from the Beijing Review of May 17th 2012, published in the midst of the election battle, which reflects areas of productive dialogue to resolve pressing economic challenges. “Trust and Respect” are the key to resolutions of differences. Perhaps this article proved effective in highlighting Obama’s dealing peacefully with China rather than in the warlike manner of Romney and the Pentagon, which may have had an influence on the electorate.
Your comments, as usual, are accepted.
Sincerely,
Sidney J. Gluck

A Boon to the Economic – Editorial in the Beijing Review

Dear Colleagues,

I’d like to share a very interesting editorial article in the current Beijing Review entitled “A Boon to the Economy.”

Clearly, changes in the economic objectives in China are absolutely necessary as a result of the effects of the world economic crisis on their export emphasis. This article indicates the direction of the changes that are taking place, and I believe will succeed, in China’s further development.

Of course, we are waiting to see the results of the November Chinese Communist Party Convention.

As usual, I appreciate your comments.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

A Message to President Obama

Dear Colleagues,

I’ve just sent an extended video letter to our President with remarks about his performance in the third debate.

I’d like to share these ideas with you in the hope that you might follow up and induce the repetition of the fact that the working people in our country are the majority, and could create votes to succeed in his campaign for re-election.

Sincerely,

Sidney

——

October 23, 2012

My Dear President,

I have just videoed a message inspired by your talk at the third debate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=cQi5US5qYJc

Essentially, it deals with developing industry and mentioning the working people, not just the middle class. This should get you many, many votes.

Sincerely,

Sidney

Economic Reorganization in China

Dear Colleagues,
Back in August, the Beijing Review had a column on China’s “Goals for 2015,” which are a good indication of how they will climb out of the present economic situation, which has been wished upon them by the Western economic crisis. Please find them quoted below.
Of course, I would appreciate any comments.
Sincerely,
Sidney
Goals for 2015
Energy saving and environmental protection: The annual growth of revenue of contract energy management will reach 30 percent, the comprehensive utilization rate of industrial solid waste will hit 72 percent and the recovery rate of major renewable resources will increase to 70 percent.
Next-generation information technology: It is projected to boast 4MB broadband capacity for rural customers and 20MB broadband capacity for urban customers, with some areas capable of supporting 100MB of bandwidth. The convergence of telecommunication, Internet and broadcasting networks into one complete system will be realized, and television signals will become entirely digital.
Biology: At least 30 new medicines with independent intellectual property will be launched in the market, more than 200 kinds of pharmaceuticals will become the mainstream product in the international market, and the number of new animal and plant varieties will reach 20 and 180, respectively.
High-end equipment manufacturing: China’s first large passenger plane will complete its maiden flight; home-made regional jet ARJ 21 will be mass-produced; and breakthroughs will be made in the development of new-type utility aircraft and helicopters for civil use.
New energy: The total installed capacity of nuclear power plants will reach 40 million kw; approximately 100 million kw of installed wind power capacity will be connected to power grids; the installed biomass power capacity will rise to 13 million kw; and installed solar power capacity will reach 21 million kw.
New materials: The country will foster 20 leading enterprises with self-owned brands and big market influences, and become the world’s major producer of high-end new materials and products.
New-energy automobiles: A total of 500,000 all-electric and plug-in electric vehicles will be on the road. 

- “A New Hope,” Beijing Review, August 9th, 2012

Leaked Footage of the Incredibly Horrible Police Action Against OWS Last Year

My dear Colleagues,

I just had one of the most shocking experiences in my life, at age 96.
When the police broke up the Occupy Wall Street demonstration on the 15th of November 2011, the participants in the protest could not take any photos, all their equipment was destroyed, and all journalists were barred. What I just saw was 15 minutes of video taken by the police. Unbelievable. You must find a way to see it.
Beating up people who hardly showed any physical resistance. Grabbing children from their parents. Six policemen beating down one desperate, decent human being.
Everyone must see this film somehow. It is the most shameful of events in our own country, rivaling beatings during the Jim Crow era. Outright beating people who had done nothing wrong in any way. The world must see this, period.
I did learn that you can view it on YouTube here:
I urge you to view the video, which was done with police cameras and not released until yesterday. It also probably is only a small part of what they filmed, so you can imagine what they left out.
Do let me know if you follow through, and express your opinion.
Sincerely,
Sidney

Gayatri Spivak in @OccupyTheory’s Journal, Tidal

Dear Colleagues,

My assistant is very active with the Occupy Wall Street movement and has called my attention to an interesting article in the new issue of the Occupy Theory journal, Tidal, which I would like to share with you. The article, written by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and entitled “What Is To Be Done?”, gives a full background and understanding of some of the issues that OWS has focused on, and highlights some potential avenues for change. Please find the article embedded below with permission from OccupyTheory, and you can find the entire publication here.

Your comments, as always, are appreciated.

Sincerely,

Sidney and assistant Tim

China Digital Times on “Contrasting Forecasts for China”

Dear Colleagues,

We’ve just read a most interesting article, “Contrasting Forecasts for China,” released by China Digital Times (an aggregator of news and analysis from China) on September 1st.

This article deals with both sides of attitude towards the developments in China as a result of the impact of the Western economic crisis on China’s own development. Obviously, China, in its forthcoming 5-year plan, is taking into account the fact that they had depended too much on foreign exports, which backfired with the Western economic crisis.

The article summarizes all negative possibilities, raises questions about US policy on the basis of these prospects, and ends with the opinion of former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, who describes himself as “an optimist for the future of the Chinese economy.” The material is most comprehensive.

Sincerely,

Sidney