Sharing Responses

Dear Colleagues,

We received two poetic responses to our recent e-mails: one on dealing with China’s association with ASEAN nations and the other on the finance capital posting with Sam Webb.  They are so beautifully expressed that I wish to share them with you.  They read like unfolding history in poetic cadence.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

—–Original Message—–

From: sxxxxxxxx@aol.com
To: sjgluck@aol.com
Sent: Mon, Nov 22, 2010 7:05 pm
Subject: Re: China’s Positive Relations: The Association of SouthEast Asian Nations (ASEAN)

Professor,

It’s intersting. The US has been shouting for weeks that China is actively devaluing its currency without offering a shred of evience to substantiate this claim while, at the very same time, we’re printing dollars faster and faster. It’s the blatant hypocrisy which is destroying our nation from within. China didn’t do this to us. WE did this to ourselves. The other nations continue to develop meaningful multilateral agreements. China is quickly gaining the trust of the developing world. We are nowhere to be found in these deliberations. We are like a dog howling at the moon. No one any longer cares what we do or say. America has backed itself into a corner of growing irrelevance. The future will go to the intelligent and productive, not the well-armed. The ash heap of histoy beckons. How long will it be before we’re officially declared defunct as the world’s greatest deadbeat?

Franklin L. Johnson

—–Original Message—–

From: Max Armand <mxxxxxxxx@live.com>
To: sjgluck@aol.com
Sent: Thu, Nov 18, 2010 3:03 am
Subject: RE: A Welcome Voice From The Left

Mr. Gluck,

I would highly suggest that you completely remove the Obama millstone from around your neck. Any attachment to him will only retard any efforts toward radical social change. Any mass movement that forms against the Establishment will most certainly have to be against the Presidency itself and thus against Obama. And though I have become quite skeptical of those who wave the banner of “democracy”, the majority of people feel a deep dissatisfaction with the current dominant form of social organization. The ruling classes emit cold sweats at the thought of all those persons who yet to be shaken to consciousness.

Obama’s attempts to work with the Right do not surprise me at all. While protecting himself from physical harm may also be on his mind, the main form of “self-protection” that Obama engages in is the protection of his own class, the beneficiaries of hierarchical Power.

As for my “tearing down” of the CPUSA, I must confess that I thought I was actually quite gentle with them. But to quote a wise man: “Criticism dealing with this content is criticism in a hand-to-hand fight, and in such a fight the point is not whether the opponent is a noble, equal, interesting opponent, the point is to strike him.” Whatever the CPUSA may have done in the past, we know that they are now only one of many pseudo-revolutionary organizations presented to consumers by capitalist society as tolerated outlets for their dissidence and dissatisfaction with the status quo. They are the alcohol of the masses.

Now, of course there are differences between Democrats and Republicans which cannot simply be dismissed. But the pseudo-opposition between the two major parties only serves to better obscure a real, hidden unity between them. As I have said before in a message to you, the liberals have shown themselves to be better defenders of Capital and the State than the conservatives. Voting for a progressive Democrat may make life more tolerable in the short-term, but the goal of anyone who desires the abolition of modern bourgeois society should be to make life more joyous in the long-term.

Regards,

Max Armand

Physician Panel Prescribes The Fees Paid By Medicare

Dear Colleagues,

I want to call your attention to an article on the first page of the Wall Street Journal on Wednesday, October 27th titled “Physician Panel Prescribes The Fees Paid By Medicare” written by Anna Wilde Matthews and Tom McGinty.

You can download it at the following.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

Click HERE to view Physician Panel Prescribes The Fees Paid By Medicare at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704657304575540440173772102.html

More On The Destruction Of The Middle Class



Dear colleagues,

In my YouTube video of October 21st, I made a strong point about the destruction of the middle class in the USA. This from a country which prided itself in the development of a middle class.

Today, I have come across an article in Mother Jones titled “Attack On The Middle Class”, which I would like to share. We hope this brings you interesting and pertinent information as we face the foreclosure debacle.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

Comparison of Economic Structures: China and the USA

Dear Colleagues,

We are witnessing a barrage in the election campaign, mostly Republican candidates but Democrats as well, accusing China of taking our industries and standing in the way of recovery.  Truth is, industry from our country has been absconded overseas by the financial capitalist sector of our own country.  On the other hand, industrial capitalists have conveyed to Obama’s emissary, Ron Bloom, that banks will not loan money for expansion.  The industrialists also suggested that the administration look into China’s dealing with recovery and financing of expansion for both privately and socially owned enterprises (60% in China are privately owned, 20% government-owned, and 20% mixed forms of ownership).  The government has loaned money to companies regardless of ownership to expand and create jobs, especially when introducing high tech and increased productivity.

Basically, the real difference between China’s economic development and our own (capitalist, if you will) is in social planning of the economy, setting goals for expansion and direction.  On the other hand, economic development is independently and privately determined by Finance capitalist groups.  Profitability is the determining factor rather than social need.  There is no special interest in restructuring industry (high tech), creation and sustenance of employment levels, or national fidelity.

In this light, I am attaching two articles from the current Beijing Review dealing with its NEW FIVE-YEAR PLAN indicating specific goals.  They hope to achieve this with private AND government production.  Of course, national infrastructure development is moving forward rapidly as the country industrializes since only 1/3rd has been developed.  They also established a fund for loans to workers wishing to set up small or medium businesses, creating jobs, distribution of consumer products and services. Four weeks ago Obama proposed this to Congress, which didn’t even get a hearing.

As usual, would welcome comments.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

Click HERE to view “Predictions for the Next Five Years” at http://www.bjreview.com.cn/business/txt/2010-09/13/content_297716.htm

Click HERE to view “A Plan Is Born” at http://www.bjreview.com.cn/quotes/txt/2010-09/13/content_297551.htm

A Short Opinion On Obama

We received a quick response to our plea to President Obama, which we have been allowed to share with you.  The respondent’s e-mail follows:

Subject: Re: Sidney Gluck’s Plea to President Obama
Date: Tue, Sep 21, 2010 12:57 pm
From: B.K.
To: Sidney J. Gluck <sjgluck@aol.com>

Thank you Sidney. The campaign finance system ties Obama’s hands. That was rigged in the 1970s by Lewis Powell the tool on the Supreme Court. Daniel Ellsberg even goes further to say that the CIA can easily take out presidents who don’t comply with the owners’ wishes. That is what has to come out here. Obama is a pawn…set up to bring the Dems down and get a radical right-wing in place here. It is NAZI Germany all over again. Like Hitler said “our problem here is too much education”. They have to wipe out the educated middle- and upper-middle class.

On Racism and Self-Criticism

From: “Sidney J. Gluck” <sjgluck@aol.com>
Sent 8/10/2010 2:30:02 PM
To: cxxxxxxx@aol.com, members@lists.cc-ds.org
Subject: Re: [CCDS Members] on racism & self-criticism

Dear friends and colleagues,

This is a bit late to join in the debate on racism and self-criticism.  I do agree with George Fish’s position for the record.

I was really pleasantly surprised to see his reference to Angela Davis and her quotation from the 1995 Dialogue and Initiative.  It reminded me of 1950 when Communist Party leaders were indicted under the Smith Act and slapped with a $50,000 bail while criminals and bootleggers had to put up only $10,000.  At the time, I had my offices at the Empire State Building and told a few business people who joined me to challenge the decision in court.

I had brought some US BONDS that would cover up to $20,000. As spokesman for the bailout group, I presented our complaint at the egregious unfairness of the court. The judge expressed willingness to consider lowering the bail and finally agreed to $15,000 (epitomizing national politics since he was obviously defending his position from criticism by still treating the Communists harshly).

When I offered him the US BONDS, he refused to accept them, answering me, after I challenged his reasoning, that I would be earning interest while bailing out a Communist. He agreed to a recess giving me an opportunity to cash the BONDS and resumed in the afternoon. At the resumption of proceedings that afternoon, all of the indicted Communist Party leaders gained their freedom.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

The Impoverished Attack China’s Preschoolers (via Working Class Study and Action)

Dear friends and colleagues,

One of my associates has brought to my attention an article by Radio Australia and other short articles on the question of attacks on kindergartens and children that have become a national problem in China. I responded to him and would to share my point of view on the emergence of the problem and dealing with it. The Beijing government has acknowledged this unusual human propensity. I’m quite sure they will be dealing with it. Your comments are welcome.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

—–Original Message—–

From: Sidney J. Gluck <sjgluck@aol.com>
To: tdmedia2000@yahoo.com
Sent: Thu, Aug 12, 2010 2:49 pm
Subject: Re: [Working_Class_Study_and_Action] The Impoversished Attack China’s Preschoolers

Dear Jay,

Thank you for the information about the attacks on children. There is no doubt that these dastardly deeds did take place and are taking place in China.  There are, also, good reasons that everyone is aware and that the government has remarked and taken action on the situation, though one might consider it a bit late.  To estimate whether it is late or whether it is propitious to go further into the problem at this time will be left to individual judgments.

Radio Australia begins its evaluation in a historically framed sentence stating that “[r]apid social change has been blamed after another violent knife attack at a kindergarten in China”.  The government has publicly indicated its consideration of the problem.  It is also taking steps not just to prosecute the offenders but to determine the cause of their actions.

From a historic point of view, the economic and social changes engendered a leap from feudalism to industrialization on the road to socialism encompassing many changes of class relations and political approaches that has been the background of Chinese politics from the very inception of the Communist victory over Chiang Kai Shek and the establishment of its leadership from the national center. The history of the various stages of the Chinese Communist Party administration must be understood for the many changes in its approach to industrializing, modernizing, and opening to the world. The Hu administration, which began in 2003, must be commended for acknowledging the complex situations, engaging public opinion, and taking action, both governmental and social, to deal with the myriad of historic contradictions.

This has bedeviled China’s development until the Hu Jintao administration begun in 2003, though stymied until 2005, to establish federal rules that supported the road to socialism and established relations between private and social capital, the essence of a socialist society as a transition to communal life.

Furthermore, one must understand China’s political structure as being quite different from capitalist governments. For thousands of years, relations between the Emperor and the regional political leaders gave political control to the regional leaders. This has bedeviled the industrialization process and influenced the development of democracy and the question of state power. China’s internal politics has been dominated by a regional structure acting quite independently of the center decision making, so long as they remained within the Chinese nation and complex. Unfortunately, corruption has been most dominant in the regions and among the regional Communist Party leaders, a subject which is coming to the fore. The socialist concept of national economic planning of industrial development required federal government as established with capitalism, which supplanted the monarchies of the age of feudalism. As an aside, Tibet was the only region where the Church controlled the land and political power hence creating a unique relationship between the Communist leaders of the federal government and the leaders of Tibet, a single entity different from other feudal states, which were dominated by landowners with the Church institutions supporting them.

Having said that, the first explanation offered is that of mental health problems, which no doubt exist even though it is not accepted by critics of the government, mostly centered in Hong Kong, from which there emanates almost regularly differences with the central government.  What remains is a deeper investigation of the conditions of the perpetrators, a time demanding operation.

The second generalization is the effect of impoverishment on members of the population who have not been absorbed into the new economic activities that would lead them to normal social relations.  No doubt this is possible, and no doubt exists because CHINA IS STILL IN A TRANSITIONAL STAGE.  The present efforts of the government to speed up development of the West and Southwest, to create enterprises through bank loans to migrant workers to set up retail shops to stimulate consumption of products being developed for the internal market, efforts to induce spending as against the national habit of saving for old age, etc., in other words, the development in China, with 130-135 million people, is nowhere near developed sufficiently to care for even the simplest needs for all of its people.  So, it is legitimate to expect that some people driven by impoverishment will go mentally berserk and destructive.  This however is negative when one compares it to the sacrifice of the 9 young people who committed suicide this year and awakened the country to the need for change of working conditions and remuneration.

Although Mr. Bakken has given us some information of incident in Zhuhai against a kindergarten, in which 20 people were killed, there no doubt are many more instances that may be unearthed for public view in this period.  I personally have confidence that the Hu Jintao administration is truly on a road to socialism and, to the best of the momentary ability, will respond to the problem and no doubt find the means to deal with it.  The solution in the end is to bring up the economic level of the country under private and social investment and government programs to help the needy where there has been dragging of their feet until 2005 despite the Communist Party rule.

At this time, there is a definite change of tone taking place in news about China, which tends to pick up the problems but to present them negatively against the existing central government in China.  This is to be found in many expressions that come out of Hong Kong, which includes this particular issue, but not the only one.  This is being fueled by the United States with anti-China moves that include: no tax breaks, no sales of high tech, interfering in negotiations that China has with its neighbors over the 200 little islands in the China Sea and East Pacific, and only yesterday, the US has expanded Asian NATO to contain and confront China. Further examples of the negative trend are emanating from US competitiveness, which might also be reflected in the number of military bases existing on the border of China in Afghanistan and the four airports, which might explain why we’re so engaged in Afghanistan.

In China, the extent of combined epochal human, economic, and social relations, each with its own inherent contradictions, and a history of a successful Communist Party attaining centralized national leadership with an objective of socialism that presupposed industrialization and federalization of the country’s politics and economics, is probably the most arduous national accomplishment in a matter of half a century.

Furthermore, the Chinese Communist Party, under the aegis of the Soviet Union, had not even studied Marxism, which only began in 2003 after financial publications in London and New York warned that China was running into an economic crisis. This caused the Party to begin its study of Friedrich Engel’s dissertation on the inevitability of cyclical economic crises under capitalism. Within a year, the government reorganized its plan by stopping investment in highly profitable industries that were causing bubbles. However, it was not until 2005 that the first socialist laws were established, in three laws, dealing with private capital, the trade union movement, and the requirement that every industrial enterprise negotiate a contract with the union; but they are still in the process of establishing these relationships that have now been accelerated by the suicides at FoxConn and the victories of strikes which resulted in over 30% increase in wages and opening of examination of exploitation and speed-up in the factories. If this process continues, it will be the development of labor relations that will unify the country and ultimately federalize it.

I hope this draws a picture of an extremely loaded development with incongruous contradictions. From this, negative human changes are generated during this process of growth and establishing a livelihood and an individual direction for human beings whose very nature must change to encompass the complications of an industrialized lifestyle that can benefit all people. One must have confidence in the present Chinese central government that it will find a way to deal with an existing problem that they have already acknowledged. Furthermore, the federal government’s efforts will also advance its role in eliminating regional corruption and deviations. The November 2010 Communist Party Convention’s theme is eliminating the corruption in the Communist Party. It augers well.

Of course as usual, I’m not opposed to any disagreements.

Sincerely,
Sidney Gluck

 

The Economist and the Rising Power of China’s Workers

Dear colleagues,

We received a response to our distribution of The Economist’s statement on Chinese workers’ rising power. We would like to share it and our response and open further possible discussion.

 

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

—–Original Message—–

From: Sidney J. Gluck <sjgluck@aol.com>
To: txxxxxxxxxx@yahoo.com
Sent: Fri, Aug 6, 2010 12:33 pm
Subject: Re: The Economist and The Rising Power of China’s Workers

Dear Jay,

Thanks for your comments.

I have been making efforts to reach the Chinese authorities with a proposal to immortalize the 9 suicide youth who gave their lives and put the problems of exploitation of labor conditions and remuneration in the forefront.  Though there had been many demonstrations before, the remonstrations of laborers even against the local political leaders, has taken on a new dimension that will affect national development.

As I indicated in my note, the basic reason why labor movement development had lagged was due to the regional domination of state power and the corruption of regional leaders of the Communist Party to their personal gain.  The Hu government had created laws for the development of a strong, national trade union movement in 2005. Despite this, the development of a coordinated, national trade union movement had dragged because national leadership of a trade union movement was not being promoted by regional leaders. Hence the workers themselves, in the regions, expressed their antipathy for the failure of trade union leadership development in a negative manner when the national union leaders did become involved in the Honda strike. The conflict reached a pugnacious stage, but after cooling down, a national leader’s statement projected federal state leadership resulting in progress and opening the way for continued development of a national movement.

One must bear these two things in mind as impediments to socialist state direction under conditions of private and social ownership, where policies for progress, determined federally, must succeed in breaking through the regional barriers.

I tell you this because I do not want to argue about specific questions of working class development.  For one reason, to take experience in other countries as the basis of critical assessment does not correspond to the specific conditions of Chinese industrial and political development, which in the last analysis is a basis for socialism with its own forms of democracy.

That will take a lot more time, but one has to see the turn this year.  I recommend that you follow carefully the proceeding of the November National Conference of the CCP, which has as its main subject the elimination of corruption in the Party, since this is a main barrier to breaking down the regional distortions of national policy.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

 

 

 

—–Original Message—–

From: Jay Janson <txxxxxxxxx@yahoo.com>
To: Sidney J. Gluck <sjgluck@aol.com>
Sent: Fri, Aug 6, 2010 9:29 am
Subject: Re: The Economist and The Rising Power of China’s Workers

Sid,

You know better than I that Marx, Veblen, Guevara all spoke of the commodification of the worker. How much money the government manages to negotiate in wages from Taiwanese and other capital investors, the human degradation will continue until the workers as Sid hopes will come organize, come to power and be able to control the government above instead of the top down manipulation.

Three Important Items

My dear colleagues,

This week has seen significant movement for change. We hope it is not burdensome to share 3 items.

Item 1:  A letter by Gabe Gonzalez to Obama supporting the department of Justice lawsuit against the state of Arizona, which is worthy of your attention.

Item 2:  An article titled “Too Old for A Job, Too young for Medicare or Social Security” by David Johnson in the Huffington Post. This failure to provide an opportunity for all citizens to benefit from Social Security and Medicare is typical only of our country as distinct from all of the European capitalist countries. It is shameful. The details in this article should be distributed very widely to build up a movement against blatant age discrimination.

Item 3:  An article, “China to become urban country by 2015”. This is a fabulous undertaking when we consider the building of the West in our own country to have taken over one hundred years and destroyed the free lives of the Indian tribes. It is a fact that China, on the other hand, is planning to undertake the massive development of its West visibly by 2015. This five-year undertaking can be accomplished only with social capital investment and a socially planned economy, in contrast to individual, corporate planning. This lays the basis for greater mutual exchange between US and China, encouraging intensified diplomatic relations and avoids any military conflicts. It also solidifies the growth of bi-polar economic world relations in a process of change toward greater social responsibility. Call it “humanism” or call it “socialism” or call it creating “harmonious society”, whichever it augers a change in world relations in the 21st century.

Sincerely,

Sidney Gluck

Apple Chairman at Foxconn

Dear friends,

The fulminating conditions of labor development in China were inevitable. It’s part of the process of industrializing the country and forming a labor movement with strong trade union possibilities. The developments at FoxConn and Honda are examples of the struggle to fulfill the government’s position, which was enunciated in 2005 and is generally overlooked in all of the media.

The first three laws established by Hu Jintao in 2005(July, August, and September) were:
·     The protection of private ownership of business provided they obey the law.
·     The establishment and encouraging of a strong, independent trade union movement.
·     A law which calls for every privately-owned business to negotiate a contract with its labor force.

From that point on and through the economic crises of 2008, the government has been following through with the investment of social capital to pay workers who had been abandoned by fleeing owners who shut down their plants, loaning money to migrant workers who wish to open a small or medium business and to loan money to industrial companies to modernize and create more jobs. Within this momentum, the conditions of labor and remuneration inevitably came to the fore as China comes out of the economic crisis generated by the West. China has between 600-700 million without jobs and an economic base in only one third of the country at this time. The program of a GREEN HIGH-TECH INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY, which they expect to emerge beginning in 2020 and reach its high level by 2040, will be stimulated by the present changes in the relationship between private capital and the working people of China. This is only the beginning. When have you heard a capitalist country whose labor challenges result in a 33.3% increase in wages and a re-examination of working conditions? What we are witnessing is “SOCIALISM WITH CHINESE CHARACTERISTICS” under the established direction of building a HARMONIOUS SOCIETY and is the best example of the application of HUMANISM to the resolution of exploitation and man’s inhumanity to man. China is different and must be recognized as having finally reached the first stage towards building a HARMONIOUS SOCIETY which, in other words, is the first stage of real socialist development.

Sincerely,
Sidney Gluck